For window installation, should I call Home Depot or a local window company or contractor?

Flingford asked:


I need to replace my single pane windows before winter in my entire house (18- 20 windows, plus 3 sliding doors). Is Home Depot a good contractor for windows and installation?

Kansieo.com

Comments

6 Responses to “For window installation, should I call Home Depot or a local window company or contractor?”
  1. It’s a little more complex than that. In most states, doors and windows must be installed by a licensed contractor. Most “big box” stores are fine retail establishments and may sell windows (among a great many other things), but usually they are not contractors. In most stores, the installation goes to outside vendors – people who are hired to install the product that the store offers. They are unlikely to offer you any other choice. Is it the right product for your home? It could be – and maybe it isn’t.

    The short answer to your question is – find a good installer first, BEFORE you buy your windows. Your results are only going to be as good as the installer you choose. Ask your friends and neighbors who they used and if they were happy with the results. Interview the installers. Ask them what they recommend for your home and where to get it. Time invested NOW is time and money saved later. Your overall results should be better with that process.

  2. bugear001 says:

    window installation

    Call all three. Gets bids from each and go with the one you feel most comfortable with. It may not be the lowest bid. I know I have gone with the middle or highest bid before. It depends on the way the person or company comes across to you. The old saying goes, “You get what you pay for” Good Luck!!!!

  3. mustard100 says:

    Caffeinated Content

    get bids. Check references. Compare quality. Pray.

  4. jack w says:

    Caffeinated Content

    First, decide what brand and type of window you want installed. This way all the offers are based on the same material. Call several companies, including contractors, and get bids on doing the job. Be sure to get a timeframe for completion – you don’t want to have a half-finished job in winter. Select the best three or so bidders and contact the local Better Business Bureau for references. Also be sure that the bidders are licensed and insured to do the work. Contractors should have a state or local license. Then you have to decide – usually by reference or conversation – which one you like the best. Get a written contract that describes exactly what is to be replaced, with what, and the timeframe involved. Good luck.

  5. got2ofem says:

    Kansieo.com

    mustard said it – get bids. CHECK REFERENCES. Compare quality. Pray.

  6. Randy says:

    I have a little problem taking the advice of someone who starts by lying to the city in order to save a few bucks on a permit! Cheap is not always smart. I wish I could tell you how many jobs like this we’ve come in and fixed! Just recently, an older couple did an entire house full of windows. Three days later there was a heavy driving rain and they all leaked! Cheap windows – bad installation. The handyman was nowhere to be found. This poor couple ended up paying to have them installed badly, then had to pay us to take every one of them out and reinstall them. It cost them more than twice as much as it would have if they had gone to a licensed contractor in the beginning. If they had, they would have had recourse against a licensed person through the contractor’s licensing board, the contractor’s insurance and bonding. There is a good reason for all that – consumer protection.

    Don’t make the mistake of thinking all windows are the same – you do get what you pay for. This goes for contractors, too. It may seem like a simple job, but the job is more than just knowing how. It is knowing what to do when things go wrong – when you run into the unexpected – and that happens to the best of us at one time or another. It is sticking with the job until it is done and done right even if it costs you money! The reputation of a good contractor isn’t measured in all the easy jobs. It is in doing the tough jobs and making them look easy because you’ve been down this road before, and you know what to do.

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